Rice, the Colorful Home Decor Company

I recently had the delight of viewing rice of Denmark’s summer catalogues. The color and decor is very Jeu de Paumes and left my eyes swelling with sugar and sparkle. Eye candy and color for kids rooms, outside and of course, the home!

I can’t get enough, can you? I’m ready to have tea in the garden with all of these goodies tomorrow.

rice

“Rice is a basic survival product for many people in this world, and especially in the Third World.”
~ Rice

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Minimalism vs Hoarding and Decadent Interior

If I could just… if this was.. it still doesn’t *feel* right!

I’m often finding myself stuck when designing new layouts for Miseducated — it started so collage heavy as I was using tons and tons of popular icons.. then I started seeing the collage thing EVERYWHERE and it was feeling cluttered so I obviously cut it down… :p I always feel that deconstructing and ridding of any excess is a positive thing.

Now why is this?

My room was very cluttered as a child and I hoped for a day when I would have my own modern, minimalist house.

As you can see my minimalism kind of lost the battle with whimsical nonsense and fantasy candylands. Obviously I find my *greatest* satisfaction in cuteness, well-designed, minimal yet colorful homes (Jeu de Paumes went RIGHT UP my alley, didn’t they yours? ^_~).

.. but is deleting and deconstructing making it better really? Is it just my fucked up sense of things?

I *know* hoarding isn’t healthy, it’s very hard to overcome like any addiction… so does that mean that minimalism is the goal? We simply *must* know! I’m very familiar with hoarding regarding my own life and have studied it extensively in my obsession with psychology and helping myself and those around me.

(… and while we’re at it, why do you *insist* on using asterisks *everywhere*?!

Because I often despise italics, use bold for other things and have a strange need to use the only flower on my keyboard over and over and over! As well as inserting random thoughts that have no relevance to the subject at hand –if anything this NEGATES minimalism–because of course, I am a crazy rambler. With all positives come negatives. ^_~)

Hoarding

Hoarding is the excessive collection of items, along with the inability to discard them.
Hoarding, also called compulsive hoarding and compulsive hoarding syndrome, can be a symptom of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).
People who hoard often don’t see it as a problem, making treatment challenging.
Mayo Clinic

Minimalism

A twentieth century art movement and style stressing the idea of reducing a work of art to the minimum number of colors, values, shapes, lines and textures. – ArtLex

Funny thing is.. minimalism is many times regarded as ‘rejective art’ and I think of it as ‘perfective’ art — it’s a very tough thing to master correctly — it can be done both very right and very wrong.

A minimal lifestyle… now that’s exactly what I admire. When applying the rules of minimalism to your life and home it helps a lot if you’re moving (I was) or organizing absolutely everything — it’s good to do yearly (*spring*cleaning)!

1. Evaluate your possessions that sit on shelves.
2. Find a place for everything.
3. Enjoy what you have.
Christian PF

Zakka

Another design movement, but in Japan. Generally means improving your environment and seeing beauty in the mundane.

When I see zakka it reminds me almost of a minimalist cuteness and innocence, it is completed with the sweet kitschy illustrations and/or designs that are *just enough* to add color and sweetness into the room. It’s very natural and inspired by country lifestyle.

Which lifestyle do you lean towards? 😉

Gallery

Merci: Landscape Online, Momoy, Christopher Coleman, Elidur, Homepic, SoSuperSam, BKK Home, Zakka Candy

All About Tea and Tea Time Talk

There’s nothing that fills my beating heart with as much happiness as a steamy cup of hot tea and the soft pages of a new book. Lucky for me, tea comes in a multitude of flavors, styles and pretty little boxes, all the more reason to spend hours admiring my options in the tea aisle of my local grocery.

Now, I’ve tried a variety of teas in my day, from strawberry iced goodness to chocolate-lovers delight. All have proven to be extraordinary! So, you can imagine my delight when I discovered the positive, health benefits associated with sipping the delicious beverage! And, imagine my double delight as I discovered that each kind of tea has its own benefits to boast! Let me share:

tea time talk

Rooibos (or Red Bush) Tea

This red tea comes from Africa and can do a body good. It is a pure tea, meaning there are no additives, and it helps slow the aging process. This non-caffeinated tea is great to drink before bedtime because it helps with insomnia, headaches, nausea and heartburn!

Herbal Tea

One of the best things about herbal tea is that you can drink it before bedtime (or if you just want to refrain from caffeine in general).

One of the most popular herbal tea’s is world-approved Chamomile. There’s a reason your mother served you chamomile before you laid your sleepy head to rest. One of its most obvious effects is that it is a muscle relaxant! It also helps with skin issues (from rashes to burns to irritation to acne) and fights off all kinds of unwanted illnesses and diseases. Not to mention it smells heavenly…

Anyway, some other great herbal tea’s include: Ginseng (Chinese, cures just about everything just as its name implies: “all heal.”), Ginger (helps with motion sickness/nausea/indigestion), Peppermint (muscle relaxer, stomach cramps, freshens breath), Cinnamon (lowers cholesterol/blood sugar),

Black Tea

I enjoy a Black tea to help wake me up in the morning. I appreciate how stable my body is throughout the day after a hot cup, as opposed to the high and low I get with coffee. Black tea is especially great for cardiovascular issues and is rich in antioxidants and cancer-fighting agents. According to TeaBenefits.com, “Recent studies in leading medical journals declare black tea a potential heart tonic, cancer blocker, fat buster, immune stimulant, arthritis soother, virus fighter and cholesterol detoxifier.”

Some great Black tea’s to try include: Darjeeling and Nilgiri (both from India), Yunnan (Chinese) and Keemun (also from China).

Green Tea

Green tea is famous for its beneficial effects, so it should come as no surprise when I tell you it’s probably the healthiest kind of tea for you! In fact, it’s commonly believed that by drinking more green tea you can increase your longevity and lead a happier life. So what, exactly, are the great benefits? Let me get you started.

Green tea is linked with weight loss, reduces the risk of all types of cancers and lowers cholesterol levels. In addition, it prevents/helps rheumatoid arthritis, infections and inhibits blood clots! All because of a very powerful antioxidant called EGCG (Epigallocatechin Gallate) that stops cancer cells from growing (by killing them), all the while nurturing healthy body tissues. Sweet!

TIP #1: Let your tea bag, or tea strainer for loose tea, steep for at least 3-6 minutes in order to get the most out of it (taste wise and health wise).

TIP #2: Add a slice of lemon to your tea and be amazed as your headache eases (or even melts away completely).

Knot Your Own Fortune Coins Necklace

Hi, my name is Amanda Yu, I am the owner and designer of ”Exotic Flavour” the colorful, playful and creative jewelry design. I am grateful that I had been invited by Miseducated to prepare this DIY story for you. I hope you will like it. I will show you how to make this Fortune Coins Pink Necklace.

fortune necklace

Instructions

1. The material is very simple, prepare a Pink cotton cord (length: 155cm and thick: 3mm) and Sex piece of the round wood ornament with a hole in the middle.
2. Put on one wood ornament and make a knot. This is a part of the clasp.
3. Coil two small circles, hold tight with your left thump.
4. Round the third circle between the first two circles, pull the cord generally.
5. Put another wood ornament and repeat (3.) and (4.) until you have five patterns.
6. In the end of the cord I made an oriental cross knot and tight it nicely.
7. If you think it is complicated, you can make any knots you like. Just make sure the little circle is not too big for the wood ornament – other part of the clasp. (1)
8. The Fortune Coins Pink Necklace is now finished.

I hope you find this is inspiring. You can combine with different materials or perhaps develop another construction from this basic oriental knot. Here are two other creation I made earlier based on the same techniques.

Life is a Cup of Cake in Seoul

I just love meandering along the streets of Seoul, South Korea — especially when I’m in Itaewon. Seoul is currently ranked as the second largest city in the world (next to Tokyo) and the Itaewon district is a colorful hub of culture and lights! It boasts restaurants and shoppes with owners from around the world and walking the streets is like walking through a global tunnel!

life is a cupcake!

Well, the other weekend I was in this magical place and quite randomly happened upon a lovely cupcake shop called “Life is Just a Cup of Cake.” Needless to say, that’s pretty much the cutest name I’ve ever heard of. Of course I had to venture in to check it out. The exterior was positively darling and lured me right inside.

Like most Korean stores and shops it was tiny, but perhaps a bit bigger than I expected it to be. Two women were sitting at a very tiny table drinking tea and enjoying tasty home-baked cupcakes. To the left there was a tiny room with teapots on display and another, larger sized table, with a group of cute Korean women huddled around pleasing their taste buds.

The owner was Korean but spoke English very well. She asked if we were visiting and was happy to hear we were Korean residents. After snapping a few shots and weighing my options, I chose a charming, “Earl Grey” flavored cupcake speckled with the perfect amount of shiny silver beads (edible, of course!). I devoured it later and am happy to inform you that it tasted very tea-like and was a scrumptious afternoon treat.

Where is it?: If you’re in the Seoul area, get off the subway at the Itaewon station. Take exit 2 and walk straight — you’ll see a side street on your left and the shop stands out like a cherry on a mound of frosting!
Please Ring: 02-794-2908 or 010-4617-2908
Website: www.cupcake.co.kr

A Little Apartment in South Korea Tour

Miseducated loves to see inside the walls of cozy apartment. How is it decorated? What unique features does it have? A person’s home says so much about them, that’s why Miseducated girls come from unique little nooks all over the world.

Now, let’s go on an official tour of Wendy Gould’s apartment in South Korea.

Want to give a tour of your home or your favorite place? Contact Miseducated and we’ll take a look and let you know if we’re interested in featuring your spot!

How to Make and Enjoy Bubble (Boba) Tea

Bubble tea/boba tea, is usually a milk tea drink with tapioca pearls sitting on the bottom, waiting to be slurped up a large, colorful straw. Bubble tea originated in Taiwan in the 1980s, pearl milk tea is the direct translation from Chinese. Thanks to Taiwan, bubble tea is now available all over the world.

Know of a great bubble tea spot? Post it! There are three I know of in the Indy-area. Strange Brew, a cafe in Greenwood, serves bubble tea as well as a Vietnamese restaurant in downtown Indy and a fast-food Chinese stand in the Washington Square Mall. If you know of any spots in your neighborhood you should list them, bubble tea is a fun, tasty drink that should be shared with friends.

bubble tea feature

Bubbles

The ratio should be about 7:1 (water to tapioca pearls).
Boil water in a large saucepan.
Add tapioca pearls to boiling water.
The pearls should float.
Continue boiling for about 25 minutes (depending on the tapioca pearl type) covered.
Turn off the heat and let the pearls cool.
Rinse the cooked tapioca pearls in warm water and drain out the water.
Cover with syrup and add some to your favorite drink.

Syrup

1 cup white sugar
1 cup brown sugar
2 cups water

Mix sugar and water in a large pot.
Cook at medium to high heat.
Once the mixture boils remove from stove immediately.
Let cool; to be used for bubble tea and similarly sweetened drinks.

Rainbowlicious Bubble Tea

1/2 cup strawberries
1/2 cup pineapple
1/2 cup rice milk
1/4 cup syrup
1 cup ice
2 cups of cooked tapioca pearls

Place all ingredients minus the tapioca pearls into a blender and blend well.
Blend it to desired consistency.
In the a glass, pour some cooled bubbles.
Pour your blended smoothie on top.
Cover the top of the smoothie with strawberry slices and pineapple chunks.

* I had this piled high like and covered in strawberries and pineapples at the E-Zone cafe in Toronto with my best friend. Too bad the cafe has since closed and I have never found anywhere even comparable!

Iced Bubble Coffee

1/4 cup non-dairy powder creamer
1/4 cup bubble tea sugar syrup
3/4 cup desired strength coffee (cool)
1 cup ice
2 cups of cooked tapioca pearls

Put coffee, creamer, and bubble tea sugar syrup in a shaker and mix well.
Add ice, cover shaker and shake until blended and frothy.
Add tapioca pearls into your desired glass, pour the coffee on top and enjoy!

➡ No bubbles? Try coconut meat or a thick-set flavored gelatin for substitutes!

Make a Colorful Malaysian Layer Cake

These lovely cakes are created with intricate layers of alternate color, flavor and texture. The name, which is Malaysian, translates to layer cakes. These cakes are not always sweet and many times have very creative flavor combinations.

The bases of these cakes are usually made from rice flour, glutinous rice flour, tapioca flour and green bean flour. These flours give the cakes a firm pudding-like texture.

If you do take the Kueh Lapis feat and bake a layer cake, please submit a photo and it will be added here~

Kueh Lapis

Instructions

1. Boil 225ml coconut milk with sugar & pandan leave until sugar dissolves
2. Separate mixture into two portions
3. Add red coloring to one portion
4. Pour a thin layer of batter into aluminium tray and steam till set
5. Pour into a bamboo steamer
6. Alternate the colors and steam until batter almost finished
7. When last layer is to be poured in, add a little more coloring into batter to give it a deep red color, pour this over as the last layer and steam

Cake

160g rice flour
20g green bean flour (lek tau hoon)
150ml water

Syrup

190g powdered sugar
300ml water
2-3 pandan leaves (if none, green food coloring)
250ml thick coconut milk
1/4 tsp salt
A few drops red coloring

Method

Combine sugar, water and pandan leaves (food coloring) in a saucepan. Bring to a boil to dissolve the sugar. Strain and set aside to cool.

Put rice flour and green bean flour into a large mixing bowl. Pour in water gradually and leave aside to soak for 40–45 minutes.

Add coconut milk and salt to the rice flour and mix well. Stir in syrup. Strain the batter to ensure it is free from lumps.

Divide batter into two. Leave half a portion white and add coloring to the other half.

Place a greased 20cm tray in the steamer and heat up for 4–5 minutes. Pour half cup of the white batter on the heated tray.

Cover and steam over medium heat for 5–6 minutes or until set.

Pour half cup of the pink batter over the white layer and steam covered for 5 minutes.

Repeat the procedure, alternating white and pink batter until all the batter is used up.

To the very last layer add a little more color to make it a deeper shade of pink.

After the final layer is set, steam the kuih for a further 12–15 minutes. Halfway through open the lid to release the steam, then cover again until the end of the steaming process.

Serve

Make sure the kuih lapis cools completely before attempting to cut (will break apart if cut when warm); cut into diamond shapes.