Make a Tiny Fawn For Your Flower Pot

This craft features pictures from Martha Stewart Living — it’s a simple and cute craft for kids. I absolutely love fawns and deer, it just so happens I’ve been lucky enough to live in a place as a child where they often came into our yard to visit.

So how about a few little fawns to top your indoor flower pot soil? Or strewn around your desk? On a cupcake? The possibilities are endless!

All you need are a couple of brown pipe cleaners, a section of a tan pipe cleaner and tiny white spots — just glue on tiny sections of white fabric or ribbon.

Also, you must send all photos of these if you made them for any purpose so I can display them here!

fawn

Make a Flower Accessory with a Hawaiian Lei

Feeling crafty? Are you not sure what to do with the Hawaiian lei that you’ve had for years but, its so pretty you don’t want to get rid of it? Make a cute accessory with it! Its fun, easy and you only need a few materials…

featsm

You Need

Fabric Hawaiian Lei
Scissors
Needle
Thread
Clear nail polish
Hot glue gun

Get a container to put all of your loose flowers in and cut the string of the lei. Keep them so you can make more later, because your friends will probably want one too. Pick out about five or six loose flowers and a leaf (if your lei has them) if you want to incorporate it.

Stack the loose flowers on top of eachother, with the leaf at the bottom. Try to stagger the petals so that they aren’t perfectly lined up (like in the picture) and slip one or two pins through to hold them together while you work.

Run a few small stitches through the middle of the flower. You don’t need to do very many, just make sure its secure and the thread won’t come loose. Try to make sure your thread is the same or, close to the same color as the fabric so it stays invisible. If you have to use a different color (like I did) it won’t be too bad, just try to stay close to the center.

Now you can make your flower look more three-dimensional, like a rose or a peony. If you like the flat look, you can skip this step. Starting with the petals on top, fold one side over and run a few small stitches close to the center. Work your way around on different layers, repeating this step until your flower has the shape that you want.

Swipe a little clear nail polish along the edges of the petals so that they don’t fray any more than they may have already. You can also use your scissors to trim any strays.

Now you can attach your flower to… pretty much anything! Use a hot glue gun or your trusty needle and thread to tack it onto a pin, barrette or head band. You can also attach it to a hair tie or wear it around your wrist like a corsage. Decorate a plain hand bag with colorful fabric flowers!

More Ideas

Run some fabric glitter around the edges of the petals, or make “rain drops” in random spots.
Attach a button, pretty bead or cabochon to the middle.
Hot glue some some crystal rhinestones on the petals to create the “rain drops”.
Add other embellishments to the bottom of the flower like ribbons or lace.

If you make one, feel free to post it in the comments!

The Beauty Benefits of Bathing in Tea [in Australia]

Bathing in Tea

Have you ever loved a food or drink so much that you wish you could bathe in it?

I’m a huge fan of tea: the immune boost, the antioxidants, the warm fuzzy feeling of a hot mug on a cold night. I think my ultimate evening consists of curling up on the couch with a cup of tea and a box of cookies for dunking. In short, I truly do love tea so much that I could bathe in it… and last year, I did.

The time: early spring. The location: Lennox Head, Australia. I had the amazing opportunity to visit my sister at her work abroad location there and her camp was located just steps away from Lake Ainsworth, a freshwater lake made entirely out of tea.

Surrounded by tea trees, Lake Ainsworth’s waters absorb tannins from surrounding tree roots and fallen tea leaves, transforming the waters into a deep, dark brew. The locals believe that the water has healing properties and that a quick swim can do wonders for the skin. Personally, though my skin did feel a bit softer that day, it’s my mind that has never felt more at peace than while floating in a bath of tea.

Want to try it yourself?

If you can’t make the trip Down Under, don’t worry, just run yourself a hot bath, drop in several tea bags, lay back, and relax.

Feeling crafty?

You can also create your own concoction with loose tea leaves and dried flowers. Once it’s ready, wrap your personalized mixture in muslin or cheesecloth (or pantyhose — thanks, Wendy!) and you‘re ready for a long, relaxing steep.

Other Drinks to Soak In

  • Sake: A Geisha secret, pouring a cup full of sake into your tub is said to soften your skin and speed up your metabolism.
  • Milk and Honey: Milk dissolved dead skin cells to make your skin baby soft, while honey has antibacterial properties to help heal wounds. It worked wonders for Cleopatra, so why not you?
  • Red Wine: Teri Hatcher of Desperate Housewives breaks out the vino for her bath to make her skin lush and glowing…just don‘t use too much or you might stain your tub!

Take the Pledge to Buy Handmade

To learn a new recipe or diy project, just explore around the DIY pages of Miseducated and within the links section above for some of our favorites!

I’m sure many of you crafty girls have your own shops so please post your shops and urls here! If you have your own idea for a project you’d love to share, simply email us at miseducatedlife@gmail.com as always! We love to hear from you.

Why buy handmade?

Buying Handmade makes for better gift-giving.
The giver of a handmade gift has avoided the parking lots and long lines of the big chain stores in favor of something more meaningful. If the giver has purchased the gift, s/he feels the satisfaction of supporting an artist or crafter directly. The recipient of the handmade gift receives something that is one-of-a-kind, and made with care and attention that can
be seen and touched. It is the result of skill and craftsmanship that is absent in the world of large-scale manufacturing.

Buying handmade is better for people.
The ascendancy of chain store culture and global manufacturing has left us dressing, furnishing, and decorating alike. We are encouraged to be consumers, not producers, of our own culture. Our ties to the local and human sources of our goods have been lost. Buying handmade helps us reconnect.

Buying handmade is better for the environment.
The accumulating environmental effects of mass production are a major cause of global warming and the poisoning of our air, water and soil. Every item you make or purchase from a small-scale independent artist or crafter strikes a small blow to the forces of mass production.

Learn more and take the pledge at http://www.buyhandmade.org